CURRENT

RICOH ART GALLERY is pleased to present Alluvion, a solo exhibition by Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota.
Known for his quixotic experimentations with material and technique, Yokota has garnered widespread international acclaim as a unique voice probing new paradigms in photography. Selected to participate in the Tate Modern group exhibition Shape of Light (2018), Yokota has been recognized with many of the field’s highest accolades, including the 2nd 1_WALL Grand Prize (2010), the Foam Paul Huf Award (2018), and the 45th Kimura Ihei Award (2019).

From the viewpoint of infectious disease prevention measures, we will make a reservation system. Reservations for your visit will begin on June 25th (Friday) at the following location.
We look forward to welcoming you.


Link :予約フォーム


Link :PRESS RELEASE
RICOH ART GALLERY is pleased to present Alluvion, a solo exhibition by Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota.
Known for his quixotic experimentations with material and technique, Yokota has garnered widespread international acclaim as a unique voice probing new paradigms in photography. Selected to participate in the Tate Modern group exhibition Shape of Light (2018), Yokota has been recognized with many of the field’s highest accolades, including the 2nd 1_WALL Grand Prize (2010), the Foam Paul Huf Award (2018), and the 45th Kimura Ihei Award (2019).

From the viewpoint of infectious disease prevention measures, we will make a reservation system. Reservations for your visit will begin on June 25th (Friday) at the following location.
We look forward to welcoming you.


Link :予約フォーム


Link :PRESS RELEASE
The exhibition gives new form to fugacious film, transcending the rote documentary functions that have conventionally defined the medium. Yokota has long questioned the calcified connotations of photography and sought to break free from camera and printing technologyʼ s march toward perfect replication.
The exhibition gives new form to fugacious film, transcending the rote documentary functions that have conventionally defined the medium. Yokota has long questioned the calcified connotations of photography and sought to break free from camera and printing technologyʼ s march toward perfect replication.
Daisuke Yokota Artist Statement

In the digital age, the secondary processing of images has become par for the course. Yet while it seems everyone uses Photoshop and other applications to manipulate their images, physical prints have largely remained behind the digital curve, unchanged beyond advances in speed and refinement. Conceptually, prints are still typically still seen as a means for mimetic recreation alone. As a result, the fate of prints as a means of artistic expression has been intrinsically linked to the current state of printing technology. A fundamental shift in attitudes toward other possibilities for prints has been slow to come.

Daisuke Yokota Artist Statement

In the digital age, the secondary processing of images has become par for the course. Yet while it seems everyone uses Photoshop and other applications to manipulate their images, physical prints have largely remained behind the digital curve, unchanged beyond advances in speed and refinement. Conceptually, prints are still typically still seen as a means for mimetic recreation alone. As a result, the fate of prints as a means of artistic expression has been intrinsically linked to the current state of printing technology. A fundamental shift in attitudes toward other possibilities for prints has been slow to come.

StareReap2.5 was developed as one such tool that allows artists to go beyond replication and add richly nuanced variation when bringing their work into the world. The advent of printers that facilitate unique expression may very well herald a new frontier in photography.

StareReap2.5 was developed as one such tool that allows artists to go beyond replication and add richly nuanced variation when bringing their work into the world. The advent of printers that facilitate unique expression may very well herald a new frontier in photography.

I, for one, have been an eager test subject in the ongoing experiment to discover what metamorphoses can arise when ink replaces silver halides.
I, for one, have been an eager test subject in the ongoing experiment to discover what metamorphoses can arise when ink replaces silver halides.