CURRENT

RICOH ART GALLERY LOUNGE is pleased to present Expanded Images, a group exhibition bringing together works by four artists based in France—Philippe Durand, Justine Emard, Hanako Murakami, and Marilou Poncin—all having explored new image paradigms as a result of their encounter with 2.5D, a printing technology developed for art by StareReap, subsidiary of the Japanese camera and office-equipment maker Ricoh.

The art critic and exhibition curator Pascal Beausse, who heads the photography department at the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in France, is the artistic consultant for this exhibition.
The event is produced by mot.tiff unlimited, in collaboration with Galerie Laurent Godin and Taka Ishii Gallery.

Under the patronage of: Embassy of France/ Institut français du Japon
RICOH ART GALLERY LOUNGE is pleased to present Expanded Images, a group exhibition bringing together works by four artists based in France—Philippe Durand, Justine Emard, Hanako Murakami, and Marilou Poncin—all having explored new image paradigms as a result of their encounter with 2.5D, a printing technology developed for art by StareReap, subsidiary of the Japanese camera and office-equipment maker Ricoh.

The art critic and exhibition curator Pascal Beausse, who heads the photography department at the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in France, is the artistic consultant for this exhibition.
The event is produced by mot.tiff unlimited, in collaboration with Galerie Laurent Godin and Taka Ishii Gallery.

Under the patronage of: Embassy of France/ Institut français du Japon
Philippe Durand’s practice is a wayfaring one, tracking down fleeting signs of changes afoot in our societies and the world around us through the most mundane realms of everyday life. In documentary style, his approach to the photographic medium is anything but event driven, resolutely avoiding the spectacular and bearing witness to the world with an offbeat and poetic touch. In his most recent series, Chauvet, Inner Space, Durand captures the precious vestiges of artistic activity seen in the Chauvet cave, home to the earliest known paintings in the history of humankind.

Philippe Durand’s practice is a wayfaring one, tracking down fleeting signs of changes afoot in our societies and the world around us through the most mundane realms of everyday life. In documentary style, his approach to the photographic medium is anything but event driven, resolutely avoiding the spectacular and bearing witness to the world with an offbeat and poetic touch. In his most recent series, Chauvet, Inner Space, Durand captures the precious vestiges of artistic activity seen in the Chauvet cave, home to the earliest known paintings in the history of humankind.

Justine Emard explores the new relationships being established between our everyday lives and technology. By combining different image-based mediums—photography, video, virtual reality, and performance—she positions her artistic practice along a spectrum encompassing robotics, neuroscience, organic life, and artificial intelligence. Her toolset traces its origins to the interactions between human beings and machines. For years she has worked to give shape to the unconscious images that arise during paradoxical sleep by creating three-dimensional sculptures. Her triptych The First Dream / Hatsuyume gives material expression to the signals transformed into the first dream images in her brain.
Justine Emard explores the new relationships being established between our everyday lives and technology. By combining different image-based mediums—photography, video, virtual reality, and performance—she positions her artistic practice along a spectrum encompassing robotics, neuroscience, organic life, and artificial intelligence. Her toolset traces its origins to the interactions between human beings and machines. For years she has worked to give shape to the unconscious images that arise during paradoxical sleep by creating three-dimensional sculptures. Her triptych The First Dream / Hatsuyume gives material expression to the signals transformed into the first dream images in her brain.
After earning a master’s degree from the Tokyo University of the Arts, Hanako Murakami moved to France, where she turned her practice toward a vast research project focusing on the technical history of media and, in particular, the earliest photographic and typographic processes. Through her investigations of the invention of photography, for instance in her series ANTICAMERA (OF THE EYE) exploring the autochrome process—the first color photographs developed by the Lumière brothers using a glass plate strewn with dyed grains of potato starch—Murakami offers us a genuine epistemology of the field.

 
After earning a master’s degree from the Tokyo University of the Arts, Hanako Murakami moved to France, where she turned her practice toward a vast research project focusing on the technical history of media and, in particular, the earliest photographic and typographic processes. Through her investigations of the invention of photography, for instance in her series ANTICAMERA (OF THE EYE) exploring the autochrome process—the first color photographs developed by the Lumière brothers using a glass plate strewn with dyed grains of potato starch—Murakami offers us a genuine epistemology of the field.

 
Marilou Poncin examines our fantasies through media representations of women’s bodies. Each of the phantasmagoric worlds she explores reveals our individual and collective relationships to the societies we live in, giving vent to our tastes, desires, cravings, and prejudices. Whether enlarging images or bringing multiple images together in a single work, Poncin narrows the distance between her subjects and the viewer, offering a tactile experience of bodies. Her new series What Girls Are Made Of is also imbued with a political and feminist dimension, seeking above all to encourage women to experience their femininity without hang-ups, by freeing themselves from dominant moral strictures and ideals of beauty.
Marilou Poncin examines our fantasies through media representations of women’s bodies. Each of the phantasmagoric worlds she explores reveals our individual and collective relationships to the societies we live in, giving vent to our tastes, desires, cravings, and prejudices. Whether enlarging images or bringing multiple images together in a single work, Poncin narrows the distance between her subjects and the viewer, offering a tactile experience of bodies. Her new series What Girls Are Made Of is also imbued with a political and feminist dimension, seeking above all to encourage women to experience their femininity without hang-ups, by freeing themselves from dominant moral strictures and ideals of beauty.
ー  Marilou Poncin Maiking Of Video 2 min 4 sec ―


ー  Marilou Poncin Maiking Of Video 2 min 4 sec ―




All four artists bring into light varying contemporary approaches to conceptualizing and creating images. Each in their own way, their cross-associations with an innovative printing technique aim to be part of a reflection around the notion of image “expansion” and new approaches in photography. Another area they reflect on is materiality and non-materiality amid the current proliferation of digital images.

Last but not least, the new creative process showcased in Expanded Images allows for remote collaboration, thus stimulating artistic production and making an international exhibition possible in spite of a global pandemic, with the resulting travel restrictions, forced closures of art institutions, etc.

We look forward to seeing you explore these “expanded images,” and expand your own imagination.



Artist Statements



Addressing the cave implies starting from as a closed universe, with a quantifiable set of signifiers, and a spectacular natural architecture, where time seems to have stood still. I purposely steered clear of objective representations to reveal the cave from a more intimate and subjective perspective. (Philippe Durand)


philippedurand.fr
philippe-durandlaurentgodin.com/philippe-durand


All four artists bring into light varying contemporary approaches to conceptualizing and creating images. Each in their own way, their cross-associations with an innovative printing technique aim to be part of a reflection around the notion of image “expansion” and new approaches in photography. Another area they reflect on is materiality and non-materiality amid the current proliferation of digital images.

Last but not least, the new creative process showcased in Expanded Images allows for remote collaboration, thus stimulating artistic production and making an international exhibition possible in spite of a global pandemic, with the resulting travel restrictions, forced closures of art institutions, etc.

We look forward to seeing you explore these “expanded images,” and expand your own imagination.



Artist Statements



Addressing the cave implies starting from as a closed universe, with a quantifiable set of signifiers, and a spectacular natural architecture, where time seems to have stood still. I purposely steered clear of objective representations to reveal the cave from a more intimate and subjective perspective. (Philippe Durand)


philippedurand.fr
philippe-durandlaurentgodin.com/philippe-durand

The process behind this work is the creation of a dream imprint, moving from the human mind to a physical substance. In collaboration with the Centre de Sommeil et de la Vigilance, a sleep research unit at Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris, I recorded the electrical signals released by my brain during a night of sleep. I then produced images based on the data output from my dreams, which I printed using 2.5D technology, in homage to the Japanese tradition of hatsuyume—literally, first dream—which is akin to the concept of lucid dreams. (Justine Emard)


justineemard.com






I had heard about photographs made using potato starch and I found the idea bizarrely intriguing.… In studying this process more closely, I noted that the glass plate autochromes also revealed the grains of dyed starch, resembling specks of pointillist paint, in the details of the image. The coating of starch, artificially colored in orange-red, green, and blue-violet, turns out to be identical to the network of visual cells making up the human retina. (Hanako Murakami)


hanakomurakami.net
takaishiigallery.com/jp/archives/14336/

The process behind this work is the creation of a dream imprint, moving from the human mind to a physical substance. In collaboration with the Centre de Sommeil et de la Vigilance, a sleep research unit at Hôtel-Dieu Hospital in Paris, I recorded the electrical signals released by my brain during a night of sleep. I then produced images based on the data output from my dreams, which I printed using 2.5D technology, in homage to the Japanese tradition of hatsuyume—literally, first dream—which is akin to the concept of lucid dreams. (Justine Emard)


justineemard.com






I had heard about photographs made using potato starch and I found the idea bizarrely intriguing.… In studying this process more closely, I noted that the glass plate autochromes also revealed the grains of dyed starch, resembling specks of pointillist paint, in the details of the image. The coating of starch, artificially colored in orange-red, green, and blue-violet, turns out to be identical to the network of visual cells making up the human retina. (Hanako Murakami)


hanakomurakami.net
takaishiigallery.com/jp/archives/14336/

As its title conveys, this series is a metaphorical shaping of the substance that could form the interior of young women’s bodies. Like an X-ray or a macro vision, the images present an organic substance in which fluids, spangles, picture cutouts, jewelry, false eyelashes, and other residues are caught.… With irony and tenderness, my aim is to deconstruct the prejudices about femininity that I grew up with. (Marilou Poncin)


marilouponcin.com
laurentgodin.com/marilou-poncin

As its title conveys, this series is a metaphorical shaping of the substance that could form the interior of young women’s bodies. Like an X-ray or a macro vision, the images present an organic substance in which fluids, spangles, picture cutouts, jewelry, false eyelashes, and other residues are caught.… With irony and tenderness, my aim is to deconstruct the prejudices about femininity that I grew up with. (Marilou Poncin)


marilouponcin.com
laurentgodin.com/marilou-poncin
Project background:
In 2020, Philippe Durand was a winner of the French national photographic commission under the title “Image 3.0” initiated by the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) and presented at the Jeu de Paume, in Paris.
Durand’s project, Roches Tazenat, was the first collaboration using 2.5D technology between Ricoh and a French artist. The Japanese company lent its full technical support for this series of six images, which joined the French national collection of contemporary art in 2021.
To build on the momentum initiated by this partnership, another artist represented by Galerie Laurent Godin (Marilou Poncin), along with two other winners of this French national commission (Justine Emard and Hanako Murakami), were invited to develop new creative processes.


Project background:
In 2020, Philippe Durand was a winner of the French national photographic commission under the title “Image 3.0” initiated by the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) and presented at the Jeu de Paume, in Paris.
Durand’s project, Roches Tazenat, was the first collaboration using 2.5D technology between Ricoh and a French artist. The Japanese company lent its full technical support for this series of six images, which joined the French national collection of contemporary art in 2021.
To build on the momentum initiated by this partnership, another artist represented by Galerie Laurent Godin (Marilou Poncin), along with two other winners of this French national commission (Justine Emard and Hanako Murakami), were invited to develop new creative processes.